Crime Survivors Program

Our Crime Survivors Program focuses on the issues and needs of crime survivors* (people who are harmed by another person/people during a criminal event) throughout Oregon.  Our goals are simple: to strengthen services for survivors of crime and to promote progressive responses to crime victims’ needs.  We advocate for public safety policies that promote: safety; accountability; crime prevention; healing; rehabilitation; and justice.  In doing so, we work towards safety not only for individual crime survivors, but also for our communities.

If you are a survivor of crime, we are sorry that the crime happened to you.  It was not your fault.  You did not deserve it.  And you are not alone.  Help is available.

* The terms “crime survivor” and “crime victim” are sometimes used interchangeably.  The Crime Survivors Program uses the term “survivor” to reinforce that there is hope for the future. Life may not be the same, but it can be good.  Sometimes, the website uses the term “victim,” particularly when discussing the criminal and juvenile justice systems.  This is because “victim” has a legal definition.  “Victim” is also used when talking about the people who advocate for and assist crime survivors (e.g. “victim advocate,” “victims’ rights,” “crime victim assistance,” etc.).

Program Spotlight

Our “Member Voices” initiative seeks to collect stories and experiences from people impacted by the public safety system to inform our work and shed light on needed changes. Telling your story is simple and confidential. Learn more….
We have a new executive director! We are very pleased to announce that Andy Ko, an attorney with a law degree from New York University but roots in the Pacific Northwest, has taken the helm as PSJ's executive director as of July 14th!
PSJ is proud to host a film screening of the documentary, “Crime After Crime” on July 10 in Salem. Featured at the 2011 Sun Dance Film Festival, the film focuses on Deborah Peagler, a woman brutally abused by her boyfriend, who was sentenced to 25 years-to-life for her connection to his murder.
A criminal justice system promoting safe and healthy communities is a widely shared goal; yet adversarial perspectives often block opportunities for meaningful collaboration. PSJ is involved in a national effort to create a more holistic paradigm for addressing crime and victimization.
Our hearts go out to everyone impacted by the Reynolds High School shooting. Acts of violence like this can shake everyone in the community. If you are experiencing trauma, please know that you are not alone and help is available.